3 Stages of Alzheimer’sAccording to the National Institute on Aging, there are three stages to Alzheimer’s disease: Mild, Moderate, and Severe.

To find out which stage your senior is in, match the below symptoms up with what your senior is experiencing below.

Mild- elders are typically diagnosed at this stage when then have some of the below symptoms. If they have any of these symptoms, be sure to have them visit the doctor for proper diagnosis.

  • wandering and getting lost
  • trouble handling money and paying bills
  • repeating questions
  • taking longer to complete normal daily tasks
  • losing things or misplacing them in odd places
  • personality and behavior changes

Moderate– the brain starts to become damaged at this stage with the below symptoms.

  • increased memory loss and confusion
  • problems recognizing family and friends
  • inability to learn new things
  • difficulty carrying out multistep tasks such as getting dressed
  • problems coping with new situations
  • hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia
  • impulsive behavior

Severe– at this stage, patients need to be cared for and may stay in bed most of the time.

  • inability to communicate
  • weight loss
  • seizures
  • skin infections
  • difficulty swallowing
  • groaning, moaning, or grunting
  • increased sleeping
  • lack of control of bowel and bladder

If your senior or loved one needs care assistance, contact us online here or by calling us at (888) 900-0048.

Mike Garfunkel
About Mike Garfunkel
Mike is currently the administrator for Family Bridges, which is a home care agency in Cincinnati, Dayton and Northern Kentucky. He is fully dedicated to providing the best home care services for the elderly.

One Response to “3 Stages of Alzheimer’s: Find Which Stage Your Senior is In”

  1. Joni Conway 14. Jul, 2017 at 10:29 am #

    Mike,
    Thanks for the emails. They are very informative. Just to let you know both of our fathers are in care facilities. I will let you know if we need extra care down the road! Hope you are doing well. Just didn’t want you to think I was ignoring you!
    Thanks,
    Joni Conway